Real March Madness: The Sorry 16

The Independent Women’s Voice introduces a new bracket this year — ObamaCare at Year One: The Real March Madness. Click on the image below to help IWV determine which ObamaCare element is the most odious. It’s a way to see in one place the 64 worst things about this law. Order your copy today of Why ObamaCare Is Wrong for America to learn about many of these harmful provisions in detail, and share your top pick with us in the comments below.

Why ObamaCare Is Wrong for America co-author Grace-Marie Turner joined IWV’s Heather Higgins and Alex Cortes of Let Freedom Ring for a commentary about “ObamaCare’s March Madness” in The Wall Street Journal earlier this month.

Live video: Book launch event at the National Press Club

Today’s book launch event at the National Press Club will be webcast online from 9:30-10:30 am EDT. C-SPAN’s BookTV will also cover this event live at their website. Please join us to hear the authors and Bill Kristol, editor of The Weekly Standard, discuss Why ObamaCare Is Wrong for America, and leave your questions and remarks for the authors in the comments section below.

NRO: Wrong, Baby, Wrong

National Review Online’s Kathryn Jean Lopez interviewed our co-authors about Why ObamaCare Is Wrong for America, the health sector in America, and the impact of the health overhaul law. Here’s an excerpt:

LOPEZ: Has [the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act] affected the doctor-patient relationship?

MOFFIT: The president has repeatedly said that you can keep your doctor. The problem is that your doctor may no longer be able to keep you. The new law will add new layers of bureaucracy on top of the existing regime of red tape and paperwork. Increasingly demoralized doctors will be subject to new rules and reporting requirements, and, with the massive Medicaid expansion, more of their practices will be subject to government payment rules and reductions. The time, energy, and effort to comply with bureaucracy steals doctors’ time and focus away from patients as they are forced to make sure they are following Washington’s rules. Most doctors are hostile to the law, many will leave practice earlier than they had originally planned, and this will exacerbate the doctor shortage.

Read the full interview at NRO >>

Empower Consumers, Not the Government

Co-author Jim Capretta testified last week that there is a path forward that doesn’t rely on ObamaCare’s price controls and rationing. “With effective government oversight, cost-conscious consumers have the potential to transform American health care, making it much more productive and of high quality, which is what we desperately need,” he said. “With such a reform, the system will become more patient-focused, more efficient, and more innovative. The result will be less fiscal stress, a healthier population, and a health care sector that delivers the kind of value the public deserves.”

In Why ObamaCare Is Wrong for America, the authors argue that the key to solving problems with health care in America is to empower consumers, not the government. Learn more about their solutions to provide consumers with the power and tools to make their own decisions about the health care in the chapter, “What We Should Do Instead to Get Reform Right.”

Disadvantages of Employer-Based Health Coverage

Co-author Tom Miller of AEI recently testified about “The Pressures of Rising Costs on Employer Provided Health Care” before the House Committee on Education and the Workforce. He concluded: “A number of blame-shifting assertions, statistical mirages, overstatements, and simplistic pet theories should not distract us from the more complex and daunting task of both rethinking the path that the previous Congress took in the ACA and pursuing more robust and realistic routes to sustainable, higher-value health care.”

Read the chapter on “Impact on You and Your Employer” in Why ObamaCare Is Wrong for America to learn more about the limits of employer-based coverage, barriers to job and wage growth, and the harmful consequences for small businesses.

Make Your Voice Heard

Writing a letter to the editor of your local newspaper is number 11 on a list featured in Why ObamaCare Is Wrong for America of 15 things you can do to make your voice heard in the health debate. In this letter to the editor of the Alexandria Times, co-author Grace-Marie Turner explains a few of the damaging consequences of the health overhaul law:

…The health law imposes more than $500 billion in new taxes on a fragile economy and takes $575 billion from Medicare over the next 10 years. Almost everyone will be required to have federally-designed health insurance, and most employers will be required to provide insurance or face fines. A vast network of new bureaucracies will be created to put the federal government in control of the health insurance market and to develop and enforce thousands of pages of new federal rules. Two massive new entitlement programs will be created, and total federal spending will top $2.3 trillion over the first 10 years of full implementation…

Read more >>

Courts challenge constitutionality of ObamaCare

The constitutionality of ObamaCare is being challenged in courts throughout the country, and the most visible suit was brought by Florida and 25 other states. U.S. District Judge Roger Vinson will rule shortly on the administration’s request for a clarification of his recent decision declaring the entire health overhaul law unconstitutional and whether he meant to put a stay on implementing the law. Here’s an article by Politico that outlines the issues. Read more in our book, Why ObamaCare Is Wrong for America, about the larger constitutional questions involved.

Governors object to increased Medicaid spending

Governors are  meeting in Washington, DC, this week for the annual National Governors  Association conference, and one of the major topics of discussion is  their strong objection to the mandatory expansion of Medicaid spending.   Not only are they worried it could wreak havoc with state budgets, but  we write in our book about the particular impact that this will have on  the most vulnerable Americans, particularly disadvantaging those on  Medicaid who have few if any other options for access to health care.